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Watch & Learn has been producing instructional music products for over 20 years. They are the industry leader in instruction material designed specifically for the beginning musician. They have books, dvds, and cd's for guitar, bass, drums, mandolin, banjo, keyboards, violin and fiddle. Use the menu to the left of their home page to choose the instrument you want to learn how to play. A few of their products are Metal Guitar Method Book, Electric Licks & Solos Book, Blues Licks & So...
Published by Sasha Brown 49 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +0 votes | 0 comments
Does learning to imitate even the most extraordinary guitar solo automatically give you the ability to improvise? The creativity . . . the stroke of genius to create the musically sublime? Does training your hands to follow the pathways blazed by other masterful guitarists--whether Hendrix, Clapton, Van Halen, Howe, Vai--instill in you the artistry and creativity to equal their genius? What these monumental undertakings ultimately do provide is the dexterity and command of the neck that wil...
Published by James R. Coffey 66 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +10 votes | 5 comments
In 1959, The Echoplex magnetic tape delay effect devise was designed by electronics technician Mike Battle and guitarist Don Dixon. Made commercially available in 1961, the Echoplex allowed a musician to control the tape speed or distance between the “moving" heads to determine the rate of delay, with a “looping” feature allowing the delayed sound to be repeated indefinitely.
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +8 votes | 7 comments
As any guitarist learns soon enough, cracks are among the most common structural problems afflicting a hollow body guitar. By their very nature and design, all hollow body wood instruments react to their environment in an effort to adjust to changes in heat, cold, humidity, dampness, as well as physical contact. And while a split on the top, side, or back is not something that should be ignored, the vast majority can be repaired relatively simply if dealt with early on. In fact, many can be ...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +3 votes | 0 comments
Truth be told, no "wired" acoustic will ever sound like an amplified version of a traditional hollow body guitar. They can add all the EQs, pre-amps, and other normalizing circuitry you want, but it’s never going to fatefully reproduce the sound of a great Martin or Gibson guitar. So, it really comes down to sacrificing the integrity of a true acoustic by buying a wired guitar or utilizing one of the “added” electronic options. Here are a few things to consider before deciding. ...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +6 votes | 9 comments
Through the centuries, a number of guitars and guitar-like instruments have been created--some of which still exist, some that do not. From popular “folk” guitars to multi-neck “mutants,” there are many types of stringed instruments that fall into the acoustic "guitar" category. Here are a few of the most historically significant.
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +8 votes | 6 comments
Since the early days of C. F. (Christian Frederick) Martin, Martin & Co. has used an alphabet and number prefix system to distinguish its various models. The alphabetic prefix refers to the individual instrument's size and shape, (which Martin terms “size”) while the number indicates the type of wood, ornamentation, and other material/construction details (which Martin terms “style”).
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +8 votes | 6 comments
ItÂ’s always best to buy from a local individual or reputable shop, unless you can arrange for a local dealer to order a guitar you've found online "on spec," meaning youÂ’re under no obligation to buy it if it isnÂ’t exactly what itÂ’s advertised to be. But by and large, the best approach is to make the rounds of the local shops until you find one that catches your eye. But keep in mind that shops that specialize in guitars rather than a broad selection of band instruments are mor...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +7 votes | 3 comments
Like any “investment,” guitars are only good ones if you buy them at good prices to begin with and they maintain their resale value virtually indefinitely. (The fact that you seldom meet a wealthy vintage guitar dealer should be some indication of how unreliable this business actually is.) But if you truly love the craftsmanship of the many fine instruments available in the world of guitars, there are certainly worse ways to spend your money. But there are a few things you need to kno...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +8 votes | 5 comments
For many players there is simply no comparison: old, vintage guitars are better. As you might expect, however, many players of the current generation argue that guitars today are ultimately superior because technology is better: factories are climate controlled, design specs are standardized, lacquer formulas are scientifically exact, and crafting is no longer left up to chance. Many players in the middle, however, argue that comparing old to new methodology is like saying the Willis Tower is ...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +8 votes | 3 comments
Although there is no shortage of schools of thought regarding the “proper” choosing of strings, you can be certain that any combination of string type has been attempted and that guitars have been rigged to accommodate any configuration imaginable. From the idea that you should never use anything other than what your guitar is factory designed to accommodate to the concept that every guitar is open to personalization--most players ultimately confirm that you gotta use what’s best fo...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +3 votes | 2 comments
As we have learned in this series of “Guitar Fundamentals,” the guitar maintenance process entails multiple steps. From cleaning the body of your guitar to maintaining the machine heads, to the steps in-between (i. e., cleaning the fretboard and adjustable saddle), the cleaning/maintenance process is relatively simple, but can be a bit daunting until it becomes routine. But once it does, you’d no sooner avoid it than you would your mornng coffee or tea. The final step of the clean...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +12 votes | 10 comments
Despite the relative simplicity of design--simpler than, say, your adjustable saddle--machine heads are actually one of the more complex issues of guitar maintenance. Simple cork-screw cranking devices into which strings are fed to accommodate proper tuning, machine heads are prone to issues other guitar hardware is not. And while adjustable saddles, for example, require some relatively vigilant and thoughtful care to retain their integrity, when it comes to machine heads, this is a case wher...
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +7 votes | 8 comments
Provided you havenÂ’t committed the cardinal sin of failing to check for a warped neck or worn frets prior to buying a guitar (which will require professional attention), periodic cleaning of the fretboard is an essential process if you want to maintain clean sound and enable smooth slides and deft finger movement.
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +9 votes | 7 comments
Chances are likely that when you buy your first guitar--whether new or used--it will be in pretty good cosmetic condition. Sellers typically give a guitar a good superficial cleaning and throw on a new set of strings before putting it up for sale. But whether youÂ’ve acquired a nice, clean model or one thatÂ’s got years of accumulated grime, every guitar player needs to know how to perform a basic cleaning to help maintain the finish.
Published by James R. Coffey 67 months ago in Guitar & Bass | +7 votes | 7 comments
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